Erroneous information in sold article

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Erroneous information in sold article

Postby AteoAltruist on Mon Apr 22, 2013 8:14 pm

I sold a usage license a couple weeks ago, and after re-reading the article, I realized one paragraph is inaccurate, or misleading. Maybe it's subjective, and 'not exactly 100% correct' rather than inaccurate, but it's bothering me.

Can I somehow give the customer permission to change the offending paragraph, or revise it for them? No, I'm not going to contact him or her, but I want to fix this.

It may betray my lack of confidence, but... with each sale, I worry a little. Maybe there's an awkward sentence that wasn't in the preview, or worse -- maybe after seeing the whole piece they'll think it just sucks. (No wonder it takes me forever to submit 700 words.) I would like to ask customers for feedback, but I have no idea how one would go about that without breaking the rules -- Rules that I know are in place for good reason. Anyway, this is about making sure the customer is happy. It's about win-win. Anyone ever feel like this, or am I just way insecure?

Any advice on either issue is greatly appreciated! (Yes, I'll email support, so skip that.)

Thanks in advance.
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Re: Erroneous information in sold article

Postby mnicol22 on Tue Apr 23, 2013 1:05 am

Hi,

I understand your frustration, but you don't really have to worry about it. If the buyer is in any way unsatisfied with your article, he can simply return it. I'm not sure if he can contact C-C and ask for a revision but, in any case, the ball is in his court now.

It's always annoying to find errors in articles that have already been sold, especially if you're striving for your work to be as polished and objective as possible. Realistically, though, the Internet is filled with inaccurate and misleading information so, when you're using it as a source of information, it all comes down to weeding out the bad stuff -which is in itself quite subjective anyway.

In my humble opinion, we all write from our own point of view and experience -at least to an extent- and we choose the information we present based on what we think is right. For example, if you ask me "how to lose weight", I'll probably advise you to watch what you eat and exercise regularly. The next writer will tell you to reduce carbs, take weight loss supplements, or check your hormone levels. And so on. The way I see it, you can never be 100% objective.

This whole "objectivity" issue has been bugging me too ever since I started writing. I wouldn't want to give out false -let alone dangerous- information, so I always try to cross-check and verify whatever I choose to include in my articles (and, yes, that can take ages!).

I apologize for the lengthy post. I guess I was in the mood for a morning rant! :wink:
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Re: Erroneous information in sold article

Postby AteoAltruist on Sat Apr 27, 2013 11:02 am

mnicol22 wrote:
...In my humble opinion, we all write from our own point of view and experience...


Yep. And, we are trying to convey a certain perspective that can just get lost by adding every qualified opinion, or every study that produces contrary info. Might be a good idea to say something like "While not yet refuted, X study found mixed results" under certain circumstances. Safety, I s'pose. If it's a potential safety issue, I'll either skip the topic, or skip the information under some circumstances.

This idea has opened my eyes when I read. That's for sure.

BTW, CC replied quickly to my email. That paragraph has been removed, they are notifying the customer, and it's up to him from there. I did my part.

Thanks for your input.
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Re: Erroneous information in sold article

Postby Kaytee on Sat Apr 27, 2013 1:17 pm

When there is a health or safety issue I always add a disclaimer, and would refuse a job if it went against my principles or I believed that it would cause harm. (Such as being asked to write a piece about why homeopathy is better at treating cancer than chemotherapy. I tried to discuss turning it into a piece about the role alternative medicine can play *alongside* conventional medicine, but it wasn't acceptable to the client so I declined.)

In a piece I am currently working on, which requires very hot water, I think it's only proper to add a sensible, cautionary warning to the text. We never know where these articles will end up, or to what kind of audience the information will be presented, so I try to be sensible when balancing the content.
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Re: Erroneous information in sold article

Postby JoyRCalderwood on Sat Apr 27, 2013 9:32 pm

This whole "objectivity" issue has been bugging me too ever since I started writing. I wouldn't want to give out false -let alone dangerous- information, so I always try to cross-check and verify whatever I choose to include in my articles (and, yes, that can take ages!).


I'm with you. I try to stick to things I know. I often feel off-kilter with unfamiliar subjects. Kind of trust the buyer to buy full rights and put his name on it (lol) and he can take any guff. You don't have to add your name. If the buyer doesn't agree he can delete the section if he has full rights.

The editors have helped me by pointing out not to say things like: We've all... or Everyone who... or Most people...

Instead I might say: At times... or Some individuals... or Many people...
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